8. Appealing to the EU Parliament

The EU Parliament consists of Parliamentarians called MEPs (Member of European Parliament) elected every five years.

You can go to their website to find the MEPs of your country.

The EU Commission is different; they’re the permanent bureaucrats who are supposed to deliver what politicians promise. But do mind the gap!

In fact, at my first presentation I got a small taste of something I was only able to confirm much later: the EU Commission is totally out of touch with the reality EU Citizens live in.

Because of this sad situation, the job became twofold:

  1. To create awareness amongst MEPs of the realities of state child-snatching and forced-adoption, especially if they were newly elected in 2014
  2. To find the right people in the Commission to talk to, in order to get things moving.

However, to judge by the resulting inaction, our meeting in December didn’t make a difference in either area.

As I have said a number of times already, one wonders just what it is that can be done to make a difference on this issue, and why is progress so difficult?

To try and break this deadlock, I wrote up the whistleblower kids case as a consolidated dossier, intending it to be used as EVIDENCE of TREASON with the EU Agenda for Child Rights in mind. After speaking with the information office at the EU Court in Luxembourg, it seemed that the best step was to begin proceedings against the EU Commission itself, before the EU Court in Luxembourg.

However – given the lack of success I have already encountered at every step within EU bureaucracy, I have to be realistic about the chances of making real change in the current system, when using that system itself. It always protects itself, and at any cost. It also takes a long time. For instance, would such a court action stop any of the criminals currently active?

The answer has to be a rather depressing no. The best I can hope for with this course of action, then, is a future “maybe”.